Salmon, Science, and Reciprocity on the Northwest Coast

dc.contributor.authorJohnsen, D. Bruce
dc.coverage.countryUnited Statesen_US
dc.coverage.regionNorth Americaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-26T16:12:21Z
dc.date.available2010-01-26T16:12:21Z
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.description.abstract"Severe depletion of many genetically distinct Pacific salmon populations has spawned a contentious debate over causation and the efficacy of proposed solutions. No doubt the precipitating factor was overharvesting of the commons beginning along the Northwest Coast around 1860. Yet, for millenia before that, a relatively dense population of Indian tribes managed salmon stocks that have since been characterized as 'superabundant.' This study investigates how they avoided a tragedy of the commons, where in recent history, commercial ocean fishers guided by scientifically informed regulators, have repeatedly failed. Unlike commercial fishers, the tribes enjoyed exclusive rights to terminal fisheries enforced through rigorous reciprocity relations. The available evidence is compelling that they actively husbanded their salmon stocks for sustained abundance."en_US
dc.identifier.citationjournalEcology and Societyen_US
dc.identifier.citationmonthunknownen_US
dc.identifier.citationnumber2en_US
dc.identifier.citationvolume14en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10535/5441
dc.languageEnglishen_US
dc.subjectsalmonen_US
dc.subjectfisheriesen_US
dc.subjectreciprocityen_US
dc.subjectresilienceen_US
dc.subjectlocal knowledgeen_US
dc.subject.sectorFisheriesen_US
dc.titleSalmon, Science, and Reciprocity on the Northwest Coasten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.type.methodologyCase Studyen_US
dc.type.publishedpublisheden_US
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